In or out? Court case on job bias casts pall on LGBT fests
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — National Coming Out Day festivities were tempered this year by anxiety that some LGBT folk may have to go back into the closet so they can make a living, depending on what the Supreme Court decides about workplace discrimination law.
New Orleans hotel collapse: Search on for a missing worker
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Rescue crews on Sunday searched for a worker missing in the partial collapse of a New Orleans hotel that was under construction, their work proceeding cautiously amid fears about the stability of the structure, authorities said.
Family ends search for missing CEO after a body is found
SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — The family of a missing Utah tech executive has called off a search for her after police reported that a body was found inside a parked car in the San Francisco Bay Area.
Serial killer's victim portraits could help crack cold cases
Most of the women in Samuel Little's hand-drawn portraits seem to be frowning. Their hair is short and curly or long and straight.
California power outages highlight economic disparity
When the nation's largest utility warned customers that it would cut power to nearly 2 million people across Northern California, many rushed out to buy portable generators, knowing the investment could help sustain them during blackouts.
Chicago teachers may test unions' 'social justice' strategy
CHICAGO (AP) — A threatened strike by Chicago teachers would test a strategy employed by a growing number of urban teachers unions convinced that transforming contentious contract talks into discussions about class sizes and student services wins public support and can be a difference maker at the bargaining table.
Who says you can't eat red meat? Food advice questioned anew
NEW YORK (AP) — So is red meat good or bad for you? If the answer were only that simple. A team of international researchers recently rattled the nutrition world by saying there isn't enough evidence to tell people to cut back on red or processed meat, seemingly contradicting advice from prominent health experts and groups including the American Cancer Society and American Heart Association.
Jessye Norman, opera icon, memorialized at hometown funeral
Jessye Norman's illustrious opera career and extraordinary artistry was honored at her public funeral. So was Jessye Norman the loyal friend, the humanitarian, the teacher and the person not only celebrated for her golden voice, but for her heart of gold.
Louisiana's Democratic governor forced into runoff
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards' quest for a second term as the Deep South's only Democratic governor will stretch over another month, as voters denied him an outright primary win Saturday and sent him to a runoff election.
Hotel collapse in New Orleans leaves 2 dead, 1 missing
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A large section of a Hard Rock Hotel under construction beside New Orleans' historic French Quarter collapsed Saturday amid blinding dust and flying debris, killing two people and injuring more than 20.
Florida timber farmers face tough choices year after Michael
BLOUNTSTOWN, Fla. (AP) — The sunsets are a sight to behold in Joe Leonard's neck of the woods these days. A year ago, lush stands of towering pines obscured the horizon, he said as he drove his pickup along a dusty Florida Panhandle road.
Authorities: 3 deaths tied to Southern California wildfires
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Three people have died at the scene of Southern California wildfires this week, authorities said Saturday, as firefighters aided by diminishing winds beat back a blaze on the edge of Los Angeles that damaged or destroyed more than 30 structures and sent a blanket of smoke across a swath of neighborhoods.
California power shutdowns raise air pollution worries
Power shutdowns intended to prevent more devastating California wildfires are raising new concerns about another longstanding environmental threat: air pollution.
Pregnancy discrimination continues, 41 years after US ban
For 41 years, federal law has banned pregnancy discrimination in the workplace. But the stories tumbling out this week show it's far from eradicated.
Illinois' automatic voter registration delays worry experts
CHICAGO (AP) — Illinois' top leaders trumpeted the benefits of automatic voter registration when signing a bipartisan plan in 2017 to change how the state finds and signs up eligible but unregistered voters: more civic participation, fewer barriers to the ballot box and modernized systems.
Facebook's Libra currency battered by defections, pushback
Facebook faces a rough road ahead with Libra, but defections by high-profile partners are still unlikely to spell the end for the digital currency.
California outages ease after wind, fire danger move south
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The lights were back on Friday for most of the nearly 2 million Northern California residents who lost electricity when the state's largest utility switched it off this week in an effort to prevent wildfires.
The Latest: 97% of blackout customers have power restored
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Latest on the power shutoff involving California wildfires (all times local): 8:50 p.m. Pacific Gas & Electric says it's restored power to 97% of the customers it deliberately blacked out because of weather-related fire concerns.
Fast-moving fire drives thousands from California homes
LOS ANGELES (AP) — An aggressive wildfire in Southern California seared its way through dry vegetation Friday and spread quickly, destroying more than a dozen homes as tens of thousands of residents were ordered to get out of its way, authorities said.
Man sentenced to death for Texas attack that killed 6
HOUSTON (AP) — A man who prosecutors say was driven by vengeance when he fatally shot six members of his ex-wife's family in Texas, including four children, was sentenced Friday to death, a decision the lone survivor of the attack says will help her let go of "hurt and anger."
Trump administration pays NGOs who helped migrants
EL PASO, Texas (AP) — Federal officials began Friday to reimburse organizations that fed, sheltered and transported migrants released this year in American towns near the U.S.-Mexico border, according to Democratic lawmakers and some organizations receiving the funds.
Judges block green card denials for immigrants on public aid
NEW YORK (AP) — Federal judges in three states on Friday temporarily blocked Donald Trump's policy to deny green cards to many immigrants who use Medicaid, food stamps and other government benefits, dealing a setback to one of the president's most aggressive moves yet to cut legal immigration and make it more based on employment skills than family ties.
With warming, get used to blackouts to prevent wildfires
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say.
California to end its use of private, for-profit prisons
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will ban the use of for-profit, private detention facilities, including those under contract to the federal government to hold immigrants awaiting deportation hearings, under a bill that Gov.
Decades after her daughter's death, a mother gets answers
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The faded photo of Rosie Hill shows a smiling teenager with her hands on her hips and a pink hat on her head, standing on the front porch of her mother's house.